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Per tradition, a bride wears white on her wedding day. Many believe that this tradition is linked to virginity or purity, which is a big misconception. In 1840 Queen Victoria chose a white wedding dress over a bright colored dress, which was popular at the time. At the time, white wedding dresses were expensive and wearing one symbolized wealth. Some also believe that white symbolizes new love.

Today, brides have questioned whether or not it would be improper to choose a color other than white for their dress. Believe it or not, prior to 1840 bright dresses were actually the tradition. It is becoming more common for brides to purchase a colorful dress for their wedding.


Tammie let herself shine when she stepped outside of tradition and wore a purple dress for her wedding. Lucky for me she offered to share her thoughts on choosing colored dress:

“It was the second wedding for both my husband and me. The idea of wearing traditional white seemed inappropriate and dull at the same time. I loved flipping through pages of a bridal magazine and seeing splashes of color on “traditional white” dresses. I believe that a gown with color is much more memorable. Walking down the street of our quaint little historic town, I came across a gown in the window. That was my wedding gown. It was an iridescent, gathered dress that depending on the direction of the light was what color it was. Mainly purple with hints of green, grey-blue and red tones.

I am sure everyone expected to see a long white wedding dress. When I came down the aisle the reaction and look from my husband told me how beautiful the dress was. All of our guests went on about how much they loved the dress. Even in third hand conversations, where the truth comes out, I heard wonderful positive reactions. So, my advice to any bride considering stepping outside of the box is, Go For It!”

As I always say, every bride is different and her pictures should reflect her personality. The same should be said about the overall wedding.

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